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A TV helicopter hovers over a pack of racers.

How to watch pro bike racing in the US in 2023

Not sure which streaming service you'll need for a given race? We've got you.

With the return of January’s Tour Down Under after two straight years of COVID-related cancellations, the WorldTour season seemed to come up fast this year, huh? Pro road racing is back, baby!

Whether your tastes run to the longform Italian tourism video that is Strade Bianche, the gritty cobbles of Flanders and northern France, or the weeks-long bender that is the Tour de France and TdF Femmes, let us pause a moment to marvel that it’s all available for fans to watch live and replay on-demand thanks to direct streaming. 

The downside of this cornucopia of coverage is that, for a devoted racing fan in the US, finding a good stream isn’t always easy or cheap. To watch all the big races with legit rightsholders, you’ll need three different streaming subscriptions, at a cost of up to $260 a year. That would get you a very nice new helmet, or a night or two in a hotel for a weekend riding trip. Do you need all that or could you get by with less depending on what you want to watch? The only way to answer that is to know what’s streaming, and where. We’re here to help.

The basics: the WorldTour calendar is largely dominated by three main race promoters and, of course, they have all selected different streaming partners, because why would this be easy? The ASO, owners of the Tour de France, Paris-Roubaix, and the Vuelta España, have long sold US coverage rights to Peacock (aka Comcast/NBC’s streaming platform). Flanders Classics, the consortium that puts on one-day Classics like the Tour of Flanders and Amstel Gold Race, is with FloBikes. And RCS Sport, which produces the Giro d’Italia, Milan-San Remo, and Strade Bianche, is on GCN+. 

Here are links to the schedule pages for each platform, listed here because events may be added in-season if rights are obtained:

But the best way to make sense of it all is our handy table below. Continue on past that table for the somewhat-helpful, possibly entertaining FAQ. Don’t live in the US? Fear not, UK and Australia versions are coming soon.

Your guide to watching pro racing in the US in 2023
LegendOne-day raceStage raceGrand TourWomen onlyWorldsBroadcast TBD
January/FebruaryDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Women’s Tour Down Under1/15-1/17WWT
Tour Down Under1/17-1/22WT
Cadel Evans
Great Ocean Road Race
1/28 (W) and 1/29 (M)WT/WWTEvent website
UAE Tour2/9-2/12WWT
UAE Tour2/20-2/26WT
Het Nieuwsblad2/25WT/WWTY
Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne2/261.Pro
MarchDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Strade Bianche3/4WT/WWTY
Paris-Nice3/5-3/12WT
Tirreno-Adriatico3/6-3/12WT
Ronde van Drenthe3/11WWT
Milano-Torino3/151.Pro
MIlano-San Remo3/18WT
Trofeo Alfredo Binda3/19WWT
Volta Catalunya3/20-3/26WT
Brugge-De Panne3/22 (M) and 3/23 (W)WT/WWTY
E3 Saxo Bank Classic3/24WTEvent website
Gent-Wevelgem3/26WT/WWTY
Dwars door Vlaanderen3/29WT/W-1.ProY
AprilDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Ronde van Vlaanderen4/2WT/WWTY
Itzulia Basque Country4/3-4/8WT
Scheldeprijs4/51.Pro/1.1Y
Paris-Roubaix4/8 (W) and 4/9 (M)WT/WWTY
Brabantse Pijl4/12 (W) and 4/13 (M)1.ProY
Amstel Gold Race4/16WT/WWTY
Fleche Wallonne4/19WT/WWTY
Liege-Bastogne-Liege4/23WT/WWTY
Tour de Romandie4/25-4/30WT
MayDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Vuelta Femenina5/1-5/7WWT
Eschborn-Frankfurt5/1WT
Giro d’Italia5/6-5/28WT
Tro Bro Leon5/71.Pro
Itzulia Women5/12-5/14WWTEvent website
Vuelta Burgos Feminas5/18-5/21WWT
RideLondon Classique5/26-5/28WWT
JuneDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Criterium du Dauphine6/4-6/11WT
The Women’s Tour6/6-6/11WWT
Tour de Suisse6/11-6/18WT
Women’s Tour de Suisse6/17-6/20WWT
Giro d’Italia Donne6/30-7/9WWT
JulyDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Tour de France7/1-7/23WT
Tour de France Femmes7/23-7/30WWT
Clasica San Sebastian7/29WT
AugustDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Tour of Poland7/29-8/4WT
World Championships8/5-8/13WCY
Bemer Cyclassics8/20WT
Tour of Scandinavia8/22-8/27WWTEvent website
Vuelta Espana8/26-9/17WT
Benelux Tour8/23-8/27WT
SeptemberDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Classic Lorient9/2WWT
Bretagne Classic – Ouest France9/3WT
Simac Ladies Tour9/5-9/10WWTEvent website
Tour de Romandie Feminin9/5-9/17WWTEvent website
GP Quebec9/8WT
GP Montreal9/10WT
OctoberDatesClassPeacock Premium
($60/year*)
FloBikes
($150/year)
GCN+
($50/year)
Women’s event broadcast?
Giro di Lombardia10/7WT
Tour of Guangxi10/12-10/14WT
Tour of Chongming Island10/13-10/15WWTNo web site
Tour of Guangxi10/17WWTNo web site
Note: Peacock Premium is billed monthly. As of June 26, it is no longer included for Xfinity subscribers.

FAQ

Why isn’t my beloved (fill-in-the-blank race) listed in your fancy chart? You guys are as useful as an Astana leadout!

Do you want this chart to be 3,872 rows deep? Us neither, so we focused on the men’s and women’s WorldTour calendars. We added a few select .PRO-ranked events that met the following criteria: important and/or long-standing events that have coverage partners. That cuts out long-running, prestigious events like the Giro dell’Emilia or the Thüringen Ladies Tour, and newer ones that might be of interest to US audiences, like the Maryland Cycling Classic. No streaming partner? Sorry, we are fresh out of rows in the chart, Chuckles.

That doesn’t mean we list every .PRO event that does have streaming coverage; not hardly. Are we consistent? Nope; freely granted that we’re making subjective – debatable, even – choices here and we have a soft spot for Tro Bro Leon. If we missed something truly obvious, let us know. 

Are more women’s races shown this year?

Depends on how you measure. After the wild success of the inaugural Tour de France Femmes last year, and various other races where viewership figures are approaching those of men’s events, streamers seem to be slowly sussing out that people want to watch women’s racing. And although the UCI requires WWT events to have at least 45 minutes of streaming coverage per day, enforcement is fairly loose (hello, RideLondon Classique).

As the Women’s WorldTour has grown, the ratio of events lacking streaming partners is about the same as last year. But, we noticed several races that lacked streaming partners in the past have them in 2023. And, we welcome the Giro d’Italia Donne’s return to the WWT, which got downgraded the past two years partly because it didn’t meet UCI coverage requirements, and now does. For races that don’t currently have streaming partners, we’ve listed event websites in the notes. Sometimes, races host their own coverage feed, although it’s often of lower quality.

How do I watch?

All three services are available to watch via internet browsers or TV apps for Apple, Amazon, and Android operating systems. Flo and GCN+ mobile apps are also available through the Android and Apple app stores.

What should I know about pricing?

It’s pretty simple:

So, $260 total. Peacock Premium has an annual billing option as well for $50/year, a moderate discount that drops your total bottom line to $250. Since Peacock is Comcast/NBC’s streaming platform, Premium access was previously included for most Xfinity cable/internet subscribers, but the company is doing away with that on June 26, just in time for the Tour coverage. If you’re a current subscriber, you’ll need to renew at the regular price then. Also, read the fine print: while Peacock Premium’s month-to-month pricing subscription can be cancelled at any time, FloBikes and GCN+ are annual deals, with no pro-rated refunds for mid-season cancellations.

Wow! Why is Flo three times the price for fewer races?

It’s, um, a lot, right? Flo’s allure rests on two big exclusives: the Flanders Classics lineup (dominated by the Tour of Flanders) and its deal with the UCI for Road World Championships. That, however, leaves a conspicuous hole between April and August where the only big race on the schedule is the Tour de Suisse.

Flo has just 30 total days of WorldTour and World Championships coverage, less than half that of the other sites. Flo did not respond to a list of emailed questions about its coverage, including why its service is so much more expensive than other providers.

Wait, Flo says it has the Tour de France – why do I need all three services?

You do in fact see the TdF listed when you check Flo’s schedule page. But there’s a catch: if US residents click on the race listing they’ll see “not available in your area.” That’s because Flo owns rights for ASO races for its Canadian customers, but not in the US, where NBC/Peacock has the exclusive.

We’ve checked, we’ve done the math, carried the one, and the irreducible truth is: if you want to watch legit rightsholders streams for all WorldTour races, you’re gonna need all three services. As for the Tour, an NBC spokesperson said some races will be shown on cable and broadcast networks, but details of which races and air dates and times won’t be announced until a later date. 

You said “legit rightsholder streams” but can’t I watch for free?

Absolutely! In the Year of Our Lord Mark Cavendish’s 35th Tour stage win (you heard it here first, folks), we won’t pretend that you lack options: VPNs, pirate streams, things of that nature. But we’d avoid pirate streams unless you like pixelated, ‘80s-video-game picture quality over HD footage. And using them miiiiight just raise your risk of getting digital herpes via malware.

As for VPNs, broadcasters are getting better at making sure you’re not spoofing your location with a VPN, so you might feel all smart and thrifty only to find out one crucial day that no, actually, you can’t watch the RAI feed of Milan-San Remo, and in the time you spent searching for an alternate feed, the race is now over because of course, like all but the most ardent fans, you logged in for the finishing Cipressa and Poggio climbs and not the 8,793 km of prologue.

We won’t sugarcoat it: watching bike racing via legit rightsholders is expensive. That said, there’s more than 200 race days of coverage here for just the listed races alone (again, there are many more we didn’t mention). Is it worth it to get them all? Only you can answer that.

OK, fine, what else do I get?

Glad you asked! Each of these streaming platforms comes with other content you might consider when making your subscription choices:

Peacock is, well, NBC, so you get all kinds of shows and movies from its considerable content catalog, but not much in the way of bike-racing stuff.

FloBikes has the rights to the Cyclocross World Cup, and also has some .PRO and lower-tier races. In 2022, they also showed a few gravel events like Unbound, although coverage wasn’t quite up to the production quality found in road racing. Unbound is not listed yet in the 2023 calendar – Flo didn’t respond to our request for comment, and Lifetime Fitness (Unbound’s owner) has not yet sorted out its coverage plans for races in the Grand Prix series.

GCN+ has the biggest catalog of cycling media:

What else should I know about watching bike racing this year?

There’s one major cycling video production coming in 2023 that’s not part of any of these streaming services: Netflix’s Unchained, the eight-episode documentary series on the men’s Tour de France. The release date is June 8.

The really fine print: Escape Collective has no association with any of these platforms and earns no affiliate commission on any signups. We’re doing this because, like you, we just like to watch bike racing.

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